Classical Music online - News, events, bios, music & videos on the web.

Classical music and opera by Classissima

Richard Wagner

Monday, August 21, 2017


Norman Lebrecht - Slipped disc

August 14

A composer and a violinist are appalled by Bayreuth’s Ring

Norman Lebrecht - Slipped discFrom the Rome-based composer Rodrigo Ruiz: I feel completely heartbroken, sad, angry, outraged, and abused. I’m in Bayreuth with Kerenza (Peacock), her dad and my family. We came here to experience one of Wagner’s most incredible achievements: The Ring Cycle. What we have gotten so far is a new surrealist, nonsense play by Frank Castorf with incidental music by Richard Wagner. More than anyone else before him, and possibly also after him, Wagner wrote and lived by this philosophy: music and drama are both inseparable things. In fact, he coined the term Gesamtkunstwerk, meaning “complete work of art”, to describe the inseparable relation between all the different art forms that make opera what it is. In an opera, the plot, the text, and the music are all part of a single whole. Those are things that are set, and that can’t be changed. Period. There are plenty of things that can be interpreted within that frame to make extraordinary new, fresh and compelling productions. If pianists for the past 200 years have found enough freedom within the music notation in Beethoven’s piano sonatas to produce a myriad different original, fresh and exciting interpretations, how much more freedom could a director find when there are costumes, makeup, wigs, props, sets, lighting, psychology of the character, and much more to deal with? Maybe it’s just easier to come up with random nonsense, cash in on their check and go home than to spend the kind of time a musician spends honestly and humbly studying the masterworks with a sense of awe and gratitude to be able to interpret them. In the current state of things, it almost seems like the music establishment wants us to feel grateful they’ve left us the music. I won’t go into detail about all the absurd things the director came up with; it would take several encyclopaedic volumes to do that, and we’ve all seen the worst of Regietheater in stages all over the world. Here we’ve had a master class on it. But, as if the desecration of the work wasn’t enough, I’ve been shocked by the things the artists, both men and women, have gone through. In this production we’ve seen them in barely-there underwear, inappropriately touched and kissed, beaten, tied to a rope by their neck, undressed, mimicking fellatio and sex, women dressed and treated as prostitutes, cameramen taking up-skirt shots of women artists shown live on an on-stage screen, and even two inflatable crocodiles having intercourse. Most artists I’ve spoken to are unsurprisingly not willing to do any of these things on stage, but since directors always find someone else that is willing to sell out, they end up running themselves out of a job. They are forced, then, to accept anything and everything just in order to get food on their table and pay the rent. What can we do? Honestly, I don’t know. All I could think of was not clapping, making eye-mask wearing a new form of protest by the audience (which I will try out tomorrow in Götterdämmerung), and creating awareness through social media. I’m truly saddened by all of this, and I feel very powerless to do anything. If you have other ideas, I’d love to hear them. Wagner’s reactions to some of the things happening to his operas on stage during his lifetime are better summed up in his own words: “Having created the invisible orchestra, I now feel like inventing the invisible theatre!” Today, I truly wished he had. From Kerenza Peacock, British violinist: It breaks my heart that I could not applaud the performers at the end of tonight’s opera. I have come on a once-in-a-lifetime expensive trip to Bayreuth to watch Wagner’s Ring Cycle. For over a century, music lovers have come here as a pilgrimage. What made it even more special was that I was able to bring my Dad, and it truly was a pilgrimage for us. He doesn’t like flying so we travelled by train for 11 hours from England. The music is divine. The production is anything but. I am truly open to innovation in production and set design; fresh ideas, minimalism, embracing new technology. But what we have been faced with has disturbed me. I have never complained publicly about any performance, and I never thought I would be writing a “Disgusted from Ipswich” type message, but I actually feel the need to speak out. I used to say I didn’t like opera when I was younger. But I set out to actually study it in an effort to understand it, instead of just dismissing it. And I have come to a deep appreciation and love of Wagner. I believe he is giving important spiritual teachings within his operas, and layers and layers of meanings. Whoever made this production clearly has barely read the libretto, let alone contemplated its deeper meanings. I came here in search of beauty. What we were confronted with was ugly on every level, a cheap Motel scene, a stage crammed full of every possible device to distract from the beautiful music and libretto. Lust and greed displayed every second, distracting from the virtues being described in the music. Giant faces of Chairman Mao and Lenin (WHY?) and lewd sex acts. The character that represents the Divine Mother forced to strip and seduce. And all this ugly rubbish made the plot make NO SENSE. It ruined the story; vital props like the sword were not where they were supposed to be, characters were talking to someone who was off stage, extra characters or noisy props were on stage. There were endless distracting TV screens. I want to ask the producers, ARE YOU EVEN LISTENING TO THE MUSIC??? Why do you think anything needs to be added to Wagner’s tale of love and virtue? If I wanted to see all that I would have just watched a cheap soap opera. The beautiful duet at the end of the 3rd opera was ruined because the singers were surrounded by moving plastic inflatable crocodiles, that would have fitted in a pantomime in Milton Keynes circa 1972. I covered my eyes with my hands and just listened. And why did I choose not to clap the singers? I have wrestled with this a lot, but have decided we have to speak up as artists. I have many times been asked to do or wear something inappropriate in a performance. We have to speak up against the system that is bullying us (especially female performers) into doing things we are uncomfortable with. The argument is that there are always performers willing to take your place. But when we have studied hard from a young age these master composers, why cheapen their (and our) efforts by our fear? By agreeing to take part, these performers are accomplices in this damaging production. A score of such incredible beauty demands our respect and our care. When a new baby is born, we acknowledge it is miraculous and we take care to surround it with love and light, softness and purity. We would never dream of exposing it to the ugliness I witnessed on stage tonight. Should we not nurture our precious and rare masterpieces the same way?

Norman Lebrecht - Slipped disc

August 16

Washington Opera faces Code Amber crisis

Amber Wagner has waked out on Francesca Zambello’s Aida in Washington. Personal reasons, it says. Her replacement is Leah Crocetto, who played the same production in San Francisco last season and happened to be free next month.




Tribuna musical

August 9

Festival Barenboim en Buenos Aires: Primera parte

Conocí los valores de Daniel Barenboim ya desde su adolescencia y festejé que tras un amplio período de ausencia (provocado por haber decidido no presentarse cuando lo convocaron para el servicio militar y en consecuencia ser considerado desertor; tras largas gestiones se lo disculpó) volviera convocado por el Mozarteum al frente de la Orquesta de París en 1980. De allí en más volvió como pianista o como director para esa institución en 1989, 1995 (con la Staatskapelle de Berlín, de la que es director vitalicio), 2.000 (con la Sinfónica de Chicago, habiendo sucedido a Solti), 2002 (ciclo completo de las sonatas de Beethoven compartido entre el Mozarteum y el Colón), 2004, 2005 (primera visita de la Orquesta West-Eastern Divan), 2008 (con la Staatskapelle y fuera del Colón, en restauración) y 2010. Todo esto antes de sus Festivales.             Por otro lado, escuché a Martha Argerich a partir de 1965; hasta 1970 la pude apreciar en nueve conciertos en Buenos Aires y uno en Praga, donde luego compartí un souper con ella, Dutoit (entonces su marido) y Antonio Pini, gran amigo con quien luego trabajé en 1973 cuando fue nombrado Director Artístico del Colón (fue echado en Agosto por Jacovella, Krieger y Zubillaga). 1965 fue el primer año de mi revista y le hice una entrevista; tanto en esa como en el souper la encontré espontánea, simpática, bella y ajena a todo divismo. Vinieron luego años en los que no quiso volver debido a la dictadura, pero eventualmente le pasó lo mismo que a Barenboim; los recuerdos de infancia y de juventud hicieron que ella, cuya popularidad mundial era inmensa, quisiera acercarse a sus raíces, e influida por su amigo el pianista Hubert, surgió la idea de hacer en Buenos Aires Festivales Argerich semejantes a los que había armado en otros lados. Martha, personalidad gregaria con una multitud de amigos músicos, y única entre los grandes pianistas, para entonces tocando sólo cámara o con orquesta, presentó su primer Festival en 1999 incluyendo un Concurso Internacional (donde integré el jurado de selección, convocado por su gran amiga María Rosa Oubiña de Castro). Siguieron los Festivales hasta 2005, cuando fue ignominiosamente echada por la Orquesta Filarmónica; naturalmente esto provocó un hiato en su presencia en nuestra ciudad. Pero años después, tras una transición donde actuó en Rosario invitada por músicos amigos, supo García Caffi del acercamiento entre ella y Barenboim y se logró convencerla que retornara, y así los Festivales Barenboim la tuvieron como muy especial gran figura en varios años recientes, con enorme repercusión. foto: Arnaldo Corombaroli             Curiosamente, el amplio programa de mano incluye biografías de ella, de Barenboim y de la WEDO (West-Eastern Divan Orchestra), pero no hace referencia a los festivales Barenboim. La primera condición de un crítico es no cegarse, y debo decir que la gigantesca carrera de este artista excepcional no implica que sus decisiones sean siempre correctas, y hubo a veces altibajos. Como hice notar en el Herald, no quedé contento con el Festival del año pasado, donde sólo tres de los seis conciertos me parecieron a la altura, sobre todo teniendo en cuenta su alto costo. Este año son cuatro los conciertos del festival, y están mucho más equilibrados. Claro está que Barenboim sigue siendo un “workaholic” (obsesionado por el trabajo intenso), y con repeticiones en funciones no de abono sino extraordinarias, más dos para el Mozarteum (que siempre lo contrató paralelamente a los festivales, y que el Colón no se digna mencionarlo en su gacetilla semanal pese a que los conciertos se hacen allí), más la mala idea de un concierto al aire libre en la Plaza Vaticano, gratis (que se hubiera podido frustrar por mal tiempo y al que no fui), Barenboim participó en nueve conciertos en diez días (y Argerich en cinco, en cinco días). No hubo esta vez charlas de reflexión con Felipe González (curioso addendum en un festival musical).  Y mi mujer, enclaustrada en nuestro departamento por un problema de salud, sufrió los problemas del streaming: dos anunciados pero no emitidos, y uno donde toda la primera parte tuvo el sonido desfasado: si tan mal dominan el tema, mejor no hacerlo.             Barenboim ofreció una conferencia de prensa el lunes anterior al sábado en el que empezó el festival, en el Salón Blanco del Colón. Estuve allí y sólo quiero mencionar algunas cosas. Por supuesto, se desarrolló con la inteligencia de un músico pensante y abarcador. Ante todo, algunas noticias importantes: a)      En el Festival del año próximo no vendrán ni Argerich ni la WEDO. En cambio, la Orquesta de la Staatsoper Berlin retornará y será orquesta de foso en “Tristán e Isolda” de Wagner (no sólo para el festival sino también para la temporada lírica), pero además dará conciertos. b)      Para 2019 volverá Argerich para festejar los 70 años de su primer concierto en el Colón. Y para 2020, cuando Barenboim tenga 78 años, hará lo propio con su primer concierto en el Colón. Y unas frases interesantes: Martha parece sólo intuitiva pero no lo es; Nadia Boulanger decía: hay que llenar la estructura con emoción y viceversa; refiriéndose al Festival: yo me ocupo del por supuesto, Diemecke del presupuesto…; ante una pregunta de Varacalli, defiende la gran calidad de las sinfonías de Elgar; para él el mejor beethoveniano fue Arrau; no hay un sentimiento europeo ahora, no hay cultura común ni suficiente educación; siempre se habla de los derechos humanos;¿y las responsabilidades?; la nueva sala redonda de Berlín logra una gran unidad comunitaria.             En este artículo me referiré a los dos primeros conciertos del Festival (los cuatro sería demasiado largo).      PRIMER CONCIERTO             El año próximo se conmemora el centenario del fallecimiento de Debussy, pero como no vendrá Argerich, decidieron hacerle un homenaje anticipado con un programa todo Debussy, con obras originales para dos pianos y piano a cuatro manos pero también con transcripciones de obras orquestales del creador francés y una curiosidad, la que hizo de la obertura “El Holandés errante” de Wagner. El resultado me resultó variable, ya que esta última es un trabajo mediocre de transcripción; un tipo de tarea que Liszt hacía mucho mejor. Y además distó de ser perfecta la ejecución (sí, hasta con los grandes pasa).             Creo que ambos tocaron en pianos Barenboim, de los cuales no estoy del todo convencido, sobre todo en graves (me suenan borrosos) y agudos (demasiado faltos de cuerpo), aunque en las octavas centrales los timbres me resultan mucho más gratos, sobre todo cuando se requiere transparencia. El dato no está en el programa pero no me sonaron a los pianos habituales. foto: Arnaldo Corombaroli             Pero con los refinados y tardíos Seis Epígrafes Antiguos (cuatro manos) volvió la magia de estos intérpretes excepcionales, tocando con una sutileza y un buen gusto que valorizaron cada fragmento al máximo. Y fueron extraordinarios en la obra para dos pianos “En blanco y negro”, también de 1915, la época de los Doce estudios y de un estilo más seco, menos impresionista, impactado por la guerra; esta música a veces áspera y muy virtuosística tuvo una versión ideal.             La breve y raramente ejecutada “Lindaraja” (1901) inició la Segunda Parte; dominada por un motivo exótico, con ostinatos y ritmos hispánicos, fue cabalmente ejecutada. Luego, y aunque la transcripción es fina y elegante, extrañé el sonido de la flauta durante el “Preludio a la siesta de un fauno”, por más que la melodía fuera moldeada admirablemente por Barenboim y Argerich diera el máximo color a los acompañamientos. Y finalmente, el fantástico mundo de “La Mer”, nuevamente en una notable transcripción muy difícil e intrincada,  para dos pianos, pero yo escuchaba en mi mente la miríada de colores de la orquesta.  Los pianistas lograron una notable versión.             Lamenté que haya tres transcripciones, ya que se hubieran podido escuchar de Debussy la muy temprana  Sinfonía para dos pianos en un movimiento, o la Balada para piano a cuatro manos, y también a cuatro manos, la Pequeña Suite. O la Marcha Escocesa para cuatro manos, que luego orquestó.             La inesperada yapa fue el Bailecito de Guastavino, tocado con nostalgia y refinamiento por estos dos veteranos y talentosos argentinos. En todo el programa, ella intuitiva e imaginativa, de impresionante naturalidad y facilidad, él siempre estructurado y claro; pero estos temperamentos diferentes saben amalgamarse, más allá de algún detalle no del todo exacto.                                                 SEGUNDO CONCIERTO             Fue valioso el concierto de la WEDO, pero no por Argerich sino por las dúctiles y sensitivas versiones de dos espléndidas obras de Ravel y por  lograr resolver satisfactoriamente las tremendas vallas de las Tres Piezas de Berg.  No está de más recordar que la WEDO no es una orquesta estable, sino que se reúne anualmente durante el verano europeo para ensayar desde su sede andaluza y luego dar conciertos en distintos lugares. Sigue formada por artistas israelíes y palestinos, más algunos otros de países árabes y cierta cantidad de españoles, y siendo una orquesta que pone el acento en artistas jóvenes, renueva parcialmente sus filas cada año. Muchos de ellos  forman parte de otras orquestas durante el resto del año.  Y bajo la égida firme pero afectuosa de Barenboim logran un espíritu de compañerismo que aleja las diferencias de la política. Son un símbolo de la convivencia y de la paz pero también han logrado una calidad que los lleva al Festival de Salzburgo. foto: Arnaldo Corombaroli             En “Le Tombeau de Couperin” el sentido de la palabra “tombeau” no es “tumba” sino “homenaje”, ya que así se usaba el término en el siglo XVIII. El original de la obra raveliana es para piano y consta de seis fragmentos, pero la orquestación conservó sólo cuatro, de una exquisita factura y poder de evocación. Una orquesta liviana y transparente manejada con mano sutil por Barenboim y con solos de una belleza poco común en manos del oboísta. Y aquí una queja: como en otros años, no hay nómina de la orquesta, de modo que uno aplaude a  anónimos cuando el director los invita a pararse para recibir el aplauso del público. Dan (no oficialmente) un motivo de seguridad (quizá ligado a presuntas represalias contra sus familias si no están de acuerdo ciertos grupos acérrimos con las ideas pacíficas de Barenboim) pero también podría ocurrir que el público esté en riesgo, ya que ir a verlos es un tácito sí a ese ideal. Y bien, el mundo de hoy es peligroso, pero anonimizar a artistas no me parece justo hacia sus carreras. Sobre todo cuando, como ocurrió el año pasado, hubo ese concierto de música árabe que identificaba a todos los que tocaban: ¿seguridad para algunos pero no para otros?             Hace diez años Argerich tocó el Concierto Nº1 de Shostakovich en su último Festival, que se hizo en el Gran Rex, y estuve en desacuerdo con su interpretación; ella no cambió y yo tampoco. Conozco muy bien ese concierto y tengo tres grabaciones: todas respetan los tempi marcados por el autor, pero no Argerich, que convierte al Allegro moderato en un Allegro Molto en dos cruciales puntos de la obra y causa aprietos en la orquesta de cuerdas y en el trompeta solista que la acompaña en ciertos momentos. Es increíble que a sus 76 años pueda tocar con  tan asombrosa soltura y exactitud a esas velocidades vertiginosas, pero cambia el sentido de la obra; además, como es capaz de producir un volumen no menos asombroso, relegó a las cuerdas, que incluso con un director como Barenboim sonaron como un lejano y endeble acompañamiento. Quien merece un aplauso especial es el trompetista Bassam Massud, que tocó admirablemente, afinado y a ritmo; no fue identificado en el programa pero el colega Pablo Gianera obtuvo el dato y lo publicó en La Nación.             Se sabe de la reticencia de Argerich a tocar sola, de modo que Barenboim se unió en la pieza extra (mal llamada aquí bis) para ejecutar a cuatro manos el fragmento final de la obra que iniciaría la Segunda Parte, la Suite de “Ma Mère l´Oye”, “Le jardin féérique” (“El jardín feérico”), interpretado con luminosa claridad por los pianistas.             La Segunda Parte nos regaló la referida Suite en sus cinco fragmentos, detallados con refinamiento e impecable gusto por un director que no en vano fue el titular de la Orquesta de París durante muchos años,  que sabe llegar al fortissimo sin violencia y dar matices instrumentales impresionistas. Y su orquesta, que nada tiene de francesa, lo pareció.             Pero lo importante no sólo de este concierto sino del Festival fue la segunda ejecución en Buenos Aires de una esencial obra de la Segunda Escuela de Viena: las Tres piezas op.6 de Alban Berg, sólo ejecutadas hará unas cuatro décadas (no tengo el dato exacto) en un fabuloso concierto de la Orquesta de Cleveland dirigida por Lorin Maazel para el Mozarteum en el Colón que además incluyó otro estreno local, nada menos que “Three places in New England” de Charles Ives.  Sólo Alejo Pérez dirigiendo a la Orquesta del Teatro Argentino en La Plata se les animó: ni la Sinfónica Nacional ni la Orquesta Filarmónica de Buenos Aires las tocaron. Dí este dato a Barenboim en la conferencia de prensa con Diemecke presente. foto: Arnaldo Corombaroli              Berg las escribió entre 1913 y 1915, y retocó la orquestación en 1923 y 1930. Si bien sólo conozco la versión definitiva, no me cabe duda de sus tremendas innovaciones y apabullante dificultad. Hay en ellas un evidente homenaje a las Cinco piezas de su maestro Schönberg y a los famosos martillazos del último movimiento de la Sexta de Mahler, pero mucho más es sólo de Berg, en una partitura densísima y fuertemente expresionista. El Präludium nace y muere en el mero ruido pero en sus cinco minutos hay una superposición de timbres y de instrumentos y se necesita coordinar temas, motivos y ritmos. Sigue “Reigen” (“Rondas”, seis minutos), muy variado en sus texturas y que incluye un vals “a la Berg”. Y finaliza con “Marsch”, casi diez minutos, la más ardua marcha que yo conozca, como la describe Boulez “una casi demente intoxicación del gesto dramático” que llega a un climax de extremo poder. Sólo una orquesta de calidad preparada por un experto convencido puede hacerle justicia a una obra de tanta complejidad e impacto emocional que parece escrita ayer, y ello tras muy intensos ensayos. Y eso es lo que supieron plasmar Barenboim y la WEDO. Mientras la escuchaba me surgían imágenes de Edvard Munch o de Egon Schiele, pintores de la angustia existencial. Por supuesto, tras esta música no cabe tocar nada más.  Pablo Bardin



Classical iconoclast

August 7

Khovanshchina Bychkov Mussorgsky Prom

Outstanding Modest Mussorgsky Khovanshchina with Semyon Bychkov at the Proms . Outstanding because Bychkov is brilliant, translating the music itself into drama. Khovanshchina isn't really opera. The libretto is confusing : you need to know what's "not" there to understand what it might be about.  It I s anti-historical, anti-narrative, adapting the past to comment on the present.  The singers sing parts which aren't characters so much as symbols.  Bychkov reveals Khovanshchina as a panorama exploring the Russian soul through music.  That glorious orchestration expresses the glory of the idea of Russia, an entity far greater than Tsars, streltskys and whoever might be competing for control. Significantly, Khovanshchina is very much a work where grand choruses dominate: the people as enduring community, rather than individuals, who come and go.  Thus the expansive orchestral prelude with which the opera begins: lush strings, lyrical woodwinds. Though the first scene is set in Red Square in the seventh century, the countryside isn't far away. Without those fields and rivers, the people wouldn't prosper, there'd be no point in rebellions or suppressions. The crowd in Red Square boast and threaten. The music here moves back and forth in rhythmic patterns, impressive and dramatic, but leading nowhere.  The drama really starts when Emma (Anush Hovhannisyan)  enters, pursued by Andrei Khovansky (Christopher Ventris).  She's German, part of a large community who'd settled the Baltic for a thousand years. When boors beat up on women all the time, why use a German, not a Slav ?  Emma's not a historical figure, but she symbolizes something. Andrei Khovansky and his father Ivan (Ante Jerkunica) fight over Emma, who wants neither of them.  Luckily, she is saved by Marfa (Elena Maximova).. Marfa was once Andrei's fiancée.but is now an outsider, having joined the Old Believers. Think on that. Thus the First Act ends with religion, not war, with the tolling of huge, ominous bells, hushed, reverential choruses and the resounding calls of Dosifey (Ain Anger), leader of the Old Believers, whom the Tsar and powers that be would like to destroy. In the Second and Third Acts, the soloists take the foreground.   The constant to and fro in the score evokes the turbulence of the plot.  The text fills in some of the background, but essentially the singers are acting out a wider drama of which  their roles are only a small part.  Intrigues and paranoia: everyone at cross-purposes, grabbing for power. Though heroic trumpets ring out round them, the Strelsky are grubby opportunists, and Golitsin (Vsevolod Grivnov ) princely by title, not by nature.   The choral lines swirl, whipped to frenzy by wildly rhythmic, yet angular orchestration.   Part folk dance, part military march.  Even among the Old Believers, there is dissent : Marfa is denounced by Susanna (Jennifer Rhys-Davies).  Thus Dosifey and Marfa represent the moral heart of the drama, the writing for their parts the strongest of all.  Among a good cast, Ain Anger and  Elena Maximova stand out out. Breathtaking singing, with fervour and committment.  Marfa's part is even better developed, with a greater emotional range.  Though the Old Believers are paternalistic regressives, Marfa symbolizes Mother Russia, their true soul. For a while, though, Ivan Khovansky feels secure. In Act Four Mussorgsky writes exotic "Oriental" dances, but a mournful solo woodwind melody suggest the luxuries might come to an end.   Although Mussorgsky set out to write "Russian" opera in resistance to Wagner, the mournful melody could suggest (to Wagnerians, at least) the shepherd's flute in Tristan und Isolde.  The chorus sings of Khovansky as a "white swan". Perhaps the melody is his swan song. Intrigues are crushed.  We're back with the crowds in Red Square, but now the mood is foreboding, the choirs singing in fearful hush. Golitisin is marched into exile, his followers marched to their deaths.  Yet again, Dosifey is the spokesman who describes the action, in tones so sombre that you can imagine what's happening though you see nothing literal.  Trumpet  fanfares, thundering timpani: marches lead the rebels and to the scaffold. Or rather to immolation.  The choral lines stretch, as if fanned by flames and swirling smoke.  The brass and percussion explode.  The Tsar has triumphed. So, too, must the Old Believers be annihilated.   The Final Act begins in gloom, long string lines suggesting desolation.  Dosifey's last sermon seeks solace in God : the orchestral colours around him shrouded, the choruses singing a solemn hymn.  The childrens' voices rise upwards, suggesting angels.  Though the percussion beats violent staccato, the choral line ascends, as if the Old believers were being lifted upwards by prayer.  Beautifully modulated singing, which seems to shimmer brightly against the darkness around it.  Although Mafra has saved Andrei, he still loves Emma, and she him. Mafra's love isn't tied to earthly things.  She and Andrei will die like "two candles in flames" for the glory of God, not alone, but with the community of Old Believers.  In the finale, the orchestra erupts, brasses blazing. The choruses sing, Mafra's voice soaring above. But heavy percussion pounds a funeral march, and suddenly - silence.  Bychkov drew from the BBC Symphony Orchestra playing of ferocious richness: you';d think this was a Russian opera orchestra rather than our much-loved familiar London band.   Perhaps they were inspired, too, by the exceptionally vivid singing of the choruses, the BBC Singers supplemented by the Slovak Philharmonic Choir, and later the Cardinal Vaughan Memorial School Schola Cantorum and the Tiffin Boys Choir.  Mussorgsky creates drama through the intensity of writing . By bringing this music so passionately alive, Bychov created drama from sound.

Richard Wagner
(1813 – 1883)

Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 - 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, theatre director and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or "music dramas", as they were later called). Wagner's compositions, particularly those of his later period, are notable for their complex texture, rich harmonies and orchestration, and the elaborate use of leitmotifs: musical themes associated with individual characters, places, ideas or plot elements. Unlike most other opera composers, Wagner wrote both the music and libretto for every one of his stage works. Initially establishing his reputation as a composer of works such as The Flying Dutchman and Tannhäuser which were in the romantic traditions of Weber and Meyerbeer, Wagner transformed operatic thought through his concept of the "total work of art". This would achieve the synthesis of all the poetic, visual, musical and dramatic arts, and was announced in a series of essays between 1849 and 1852. Wagner realised this concept most fully in the first half of the monumental four-opera cycle Der Ring des Nibelungen. His Tristan und Isolde is sometimes described as marking the start of modern music. He had his own opera house built, the Bayreuth Festspielhaus, which contained many novel design features. It was here that the Ring and Parsifal received their premieres and where his most important stage works continue to be performed today in an annual festival run by his descendants.



[+] More news (Richard Wagner)
Aug 20
Meeting in Music
Aug 17
ArtsJournal: music
Aug 17
parterre box
Aug 16
Topix - Opera
Aug 16
parterre box
Aug 16
Norman Lebrecht -...
Aug 15
Topix - Opera
Aug 14
Norman Lebrecht -...
Aug 12
Wordpress Sphere
Aug 12
Wordpress Sphere
Aug 12
Topix - Opera
Aug 12
Meeting in Music
Aug 11
Topix - Opera
Aug 10
Norman Lebrecht -...
Aug 10
Wordpress Sphere
Aug 9
Tribuna musical
Aug 8
Topix - Opera
Aug 8
Iron Tongue of Mi...
Aug 7
Topix - Opera
Aug 7
Classical iconoclast

Richard Wagner




Wagner on the web...



Richard Wagner »

Great composers of classical music

Operas Parsifal Ring Of The Nibelung Rhine Gold Valkyrie Twilight Of The Gods Tristan And Isolde

Since January 2009, Classissima has simplified access to classical music and enlarged its audience.
With innovative sections, Classissima assists newbies and classical music lovers in their web experience.


Great conductors, Great performers, Great opera singers
 
Great composers of classical music
Bach
Beethoven
Brahms
Debussy
Dvorak
Handel
Mendelsohn
Mozart
Ravel
Schubert
Tchaikovsky
Verdi
Vivaldi
Wagner
[...]


Explore 10 centuries in classical music...